UTRECHT TE DEUM

Utrecht Te Deum and Jubilate is the common name for a sacred choral composition in two parts, written by George Frideric Handel to celebrate the Treaty of Utrecht, which established the Peace of Utrecht in 1713, ending the War of the Spanish Succession. He composed a Te DeumHWV 278, and a Jubilate Deo (Psalm 100), HWV 279. 

 

The Utrecht Te Deum and Jubilate was first heard at a public rehearsal in St. Paul's Cathedral in London on 5 March 1713, when a newspaper reported that ‘many Persons of Quality of both Sexes’ attended, and that the music was ‘much commended by all that have heard the same, and are competent Judges therein’. The official premiere of the work was on 13 July 1713 in a service in St Paul's.  

The Utrecht Te Deum and Jubilate was a turning point in Handel’s career, as it was for English church music. It was the first major piece of religious music Handel wrote to English words, and it is the earliest choral work by him that remained in the repertory: it was performed in St Paul’s during the annual Festival of the Sons of the Clergy every other year (alternating with the Purcell Te Deum) until 1743, when it was replaced by Handel’s Dettingen Te Deum. 

PDF's of the music will be available once your registration has been accepted.

For a preliminary look at the music please refer to the IMSLP link here:

https://imslp.org/wiki/Te_Deum_in_D_major%2C_HWV_278_(Handel%2C_George_Frideric)

Note:  recorders will be assigned flute/oboe/trumpet parts for tutti sections depending on the instrumentation available

CONCERTO GROSSO NO. 3 OP. 3

 

The Concerti Grossi, Op. 3, HWV 312–317, are six concerti grossi by George Frideric Handel compiled into a set and published by John Walsh in 1734. Musicologists now agree that Handel had no initial knowledge of the publishing. Instead, Walsh, seeking to take advantage of the commercial success of Corelli's Opus 6 Concerti Grossi, simply combined several of Handel's already existing works and grouped them into six "concertos".  Walsh cunningly adopted a very misleading title page for these concertos (pictured at left), proclaiming a string scoring identical to Corelli’s. Nothing could have been further from the truth since all of the concerti make extensive use of wind instruments, and even in 1784 they were known (also inaccurately!) as ‘Handel’s Oboe Concertos’.

We will perform Concerto No. 3 There is little doubt that this concerto was compiled by Walsh himself—the Largo, Allegro and Adagio are derived from the opening movements of an anthem and a Te Deum which Handel composed for the Duke of Chandos, and the final Allegro from a harpsichord Fugue in G (HWV252, 281 and 606 respectively).  The work contains a virtuosic solo for flute in the first movement.

PDF's of the music will be available once your registration has been accepted.

For a preliminary look at the music please refer to the IMSLP link here:

https://imslp.org/wiki/Concerto_Grosso_in_G_major,_HWV_314_(Handel,_George_Frideric)

Note:  recorders will be assigned flute/oboe/trumpet parts for tutti sections depending on the instrumentation available

CHAMBER MUSIC

There will  be no official tutoring on chamber music at this workshop, but if you have a pre-formed group that would like to play at the final concert on Monday please let us know.   We have scheduled a couple of hours where the tutors will be available to listen to your group and provide feedback.  Please select baroque music!

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